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Child Support Archives

What if the noncustodial parent doesn't pay child support?

Taking care of the children is the responsibility of both parents. In many cases where the parents are not together, one Illinois parent has physical custody of the children and the noncustodial parent is responsible for taking care of the children in part by payment of child support. The majority of the time, this arrangement works; however, there are instances where the parent responsible for child support payments fails to comply.

Establishing paternity important in child support cases

Moms and dads often look forward to the birth of their child. After months of planning and dreaming, the little bundle of joy arrives and the lives of two Illinois residents are forever changed. At least this is what happens in many cases. However, in other instances, the question of paternity may arise and the need to establish child support may be a concern.

Child support is the responsibility of both parents

Years ago, the norm was that children were raised in a home with both parents present. However, in today's society, it is common place for children to be raised in a home with only one parent. This scenario is often the product of divorce or unmarried parents having a child. Regardless, children do need the support of both parents; therefore, child support is usually issued by the Illinois court.

Proposed child support law change could affect payments for some

When couples decide to get divorced, they must contemplate multiple factors that may not only affect their lives, but their children's lives as well. Determining who will pay child support and how much should be paid is often a decision parents will face. One Illinois man is attempting to change some of the laws regarding child support where injured or disabled parents are concerned.

New child support law may effect Illinois families

Illinois couples who are contemplating divorce must take many factors into consideration. Cases with children involved are often more complex than those without due to elements such as determining custody and child support. However, a recent change in child support law intends to make the calculation of payments easier and more fair to the non-custodial parent.

Illinois couples divorcing may need to consider child support

When a divorce is imminent for an Illinois couple, they may be unsure of how to proceed. In many cases, the best option is for each spouse to consult separate experienced divorce attorneys. This is particularly true for more complicated divorces where couples have children and the parents must consider their child support options. 

What is the history of child support?

Many people in Illinois deal with the child support system. You may receive or pay child support due to a divorce or other situation where both parents are not in the home. There are many different situations today where child support is ordered, but today’s situations are much different than how things were when the system was put into place in the mid-1970s.

Child support does not cover all costs of raising a child

During your divorce in Illinois, one of your top concerns is likely to be your children. Because you are going from one home to two, it can be difficult to spilt the income fairly to ensure the children are well-cared for. At Lois Kulinsky & Associates, LTD, we understand that challenges presented in this situation. That is why the courts order child support.

Child support modification process

Illinois child support orders are not set in stone. According to the Department of Health and Family Services, substantial changes in circumstances can because for a child support modification request. In addition, every case can be modified every three years. Support may be increased, reduced or, in some cases, ended. First, a case must be reviewed, which involves checking into financial information and other related facts, such as employment.

Back child support and the Passport Denial Program

Those who are unable to pay child support may face various consequences, some of which can completely upend life. In Wheeling, and cities throughout Illinois, back child support can result in steep financial penalties and arrest. Moreover, unpaid child support could leave a non-custodial parent unable to use his or her passport if they wish to leave the country. For those who are passionate about travel or need to head overseas for business, this is often devastating.