Can You Change Your Parenting or Support Order?

Following a divorce or a paternity case, it is important to note two facts: First, the parenting and support arrangements you made are court orders and need to be followed. Second, these orders can be modified to accommodate major life changes. The family law attorneys of Lois Kulinsky & Associates, Ltd., have more than 45 years of combined experience handling post-decree matters, including enforcement actions and modifications.

If we handled your divorce or paternity case, you know how careful we are about making our fees affordable and taking steps to work with you on payments, allowing you to pay by credit card or through an installment plan. If you are new to our law firm, we invite you to find out.

Enforcement of Child Support, Alimony, Property and Parenting Orders

An enforcement action may be necessary any time one spouse does not fulfill the terms of a divorce decree or paternity order:

  • Are child support payments not being made?
  • Are alimony/spousal maintenance payments not being made?
  • Has your former spouse failed to adhere to parenting arrangements?
  • Has your former spouse neglected to do the necessary paperwork to divide the 401(k) plan, IRA account or pension?
  • Has your former spouse switched the beneficiary on the life insurance policy to a new spouse's name, rather than the child's name, as agreed upon?
  • Has your former spouse let medical insurance lapse, leaving your child's medical bills unpaid?
  • Has your former spouse failed to pay college education expenses, as agreed upon?

If you need to enforce your order or are the subject of an enforcement action, our lawyers can assist you in resolving the situation. We have been helping people throughout the greater Chicago area with property, parenting, alimony and child support enforcement since 1983.

Modifications to Divorce and Family Court Orders

Changes to existing property, support or parenting orders may be needed in the future. In Illinois, modifications are available for a variety of reasons, ranging from remarriage to changes in income or work schedules. Perhaps something was intentionally left open in the original arrangements, such as an indication of how the child's college education expenses would be divided, requiring that the arrangements be revisited. Perhaps major life changes require the change.

Relocation of Children

A parent must give the other parent significant notice and/or get a court order before moving a child away from the other parent. The other parent will typically still have the right to be part of the child's life. Unique parenting schedules or parenting/visitation arrangements may need to be made. Even for parents who were never married, if paternity has been established, a court order must be obtained before moving the child out of state.

Learn more about post-decree matters by reviewing the resources offered on this website, including our family law FAQs and many family law articles written by our attorneys.

Contact Us for a Free, Half-Hour Initial Consultation

Contact us online or call one of our offices to schedule a free, half-hour consultation with one of our attorneys. Our main office in Wheeling and Buffalo Grove can be reached at 847-459-4448, and the number for our secondary office in Libertyville is 847-281-0200.